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The Harmful Lie We Tell Ourselves About Our Health

When an illness hits or a health complication looks like it may turn serious, it’s common to be overcome by one thought: I can’t believe this is happening to me.

It may seem like a harmless sentiment, but at the heart of it lies a very dangerous assumption, according to medical intuitive and spiritual teacher Caroline Myss.

“[It’s] as if we’re exceptions to the rule,” she says. “Like, ‘I do everything right, and something wrong is happening to me.’ What I have to say to you is, there’s no such thing as an exception.”

Telling yourself that you are an exception, Myss continues, isn’t just inaccurate; it’s actually harmful.

“One of the most painful things you can tell yourself is that you are the exception to a rule,” she says. “That you are the exception to what happens to all living creatures. That somehow or other, you are living outside the laws of life. That what breaks down everybody else’s body can’t touch yours. That somehow, other people will age, but not you.”

[People think] that somehow, if you’re a positive person, negative things shouldn’t happen to you. Now, you just stop that.

The reality is that upsetting things like illnesses happen to everyone. As Myss points out, it has nothing to do with what you may or may not deserve.

“[People think] that somehow, if you’re a positive person, negative things shouldn’t happen to you,” she says. “Now, you just stop that.”

Besides, Myss adds, it’s impossible to know enough about your past, present and future to make sweeping statements about your ultimate positivity in the first place.

“I want to put you in your bubble and say, ‘Well, what positive things do you think are protecting you?’ Is it your psychic positive, your emotional? How about all your past lives? How about your future lives?” she poses. “You can’t possibly know yourself that well.”

The sooner you can come to terms with the fact that you’re not the exception, the better prepared you’ll be to face what’s ahead, Myss concludes.

Another thing Myss suggests you stop saying:

Remove “I never meant to hurt you” from your apologies (and say this instead)

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/most-painful-lie-you-can-tell-yourself_us_57a24ed3e4b0e1aac91494cd?section=&